Sisters of the Yam

Although most of the issues brought to light here pertain to Africa(ns), this is a blog about culture and world issues.
Hopefully you see some interesting stuff and learn a thing or two.

Tornadoisland is my personal blog. It's not too serious

From a fandom and wondering what this politics blog is doing following you?
This is the reason why
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motherlandattires:

Adwoa and Samuel. A Ghanian Engagement Session

January 24, 2013

Will be shooting the lovely couple in Boston sometime this summer and was extremely happy to have traveled there for their awesome traditional Ghanian Engagement session. The colorful attire and detailed beadings are truly rich of the Culture and looked flawless with her amazing complexion. Adwoa even showed me a little Azonto dance. I can’t wait to photograph the wedding. Here are some from the session.

(via black-culture)

championcoolbreeze:

obfuscatingdeity:

the thing to realize here is that conservatives find the idea of paying workers a livable wage so absurd that they make hyperbolic comparisons like this

because fifteen dollars and hour and a hundred thousand dollars an hour both mean the same thing to them; more than you deserve

^That commentary is very important.

The truth. It’s here

(via curvellas)

elqiao:

awkwardsituationist:

thirteen year old ashol pan is part of a nascent movement of girls who are keeping alive the six thousand year old kazakh tradition of golden eagle hunting known as berkutchy.

though long the monopoly of boys — once deemed uniquely strong enough to carry a full grown eagle on their arms and endure harsh winter hunts — fewer are now learning the skill, abandoning their traditional semi nomadic ways for life in the cities.

berkutchy is a life long profession, and is often a hereditary one. but ashol’s brother left for the military, leaving her father, an experienced eagle hunter, to ask if she would take his place and assume training.

asher svidensky — who took these photos during a four month trek in the mountains of western mongolia’s bayan ulgii (or “rich cradle”) province, where only 250 hunters remain — told the bbc that where most boys are at first apprehensive around their eagles, ashol was very much at ease.

ashol, though still in school, will spend much of her time nurturing her eagle, imprinting herself on the fiercely independent bird from birth. after much time and training, her eagle — who is considered a member of the family — will learn to track down rabbits, foxes and wolves, whose furs are needed for the harsh winters.

Also the cuteness here: image

(via agentotter)

gradientlair:

This is beautiful. [X]

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

rs620:

"Being black is not a crime." South Sudanese and Eritrean refugees protest against prosecution in Tel Aviv, Israel 

(via theuppitynegras)

otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE

via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

[bolding mine]

Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).

The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

(via jawdust)

halfhardtorock:

I Traveled to Palestine-Israel And Discovered There is no ‘Palestinian-Israeli Conflict’

redphilistine:

Ferrari Shepard, a member of a recent Black American delegation to Palestine, reflects on his visit after returning to the U.S.

bhargette:

Beautiful Ghana: Image collected by Lars during a trip to Kumasi.

bhargette:

Beautiful Ghana: Image collected by Lars during a trip to Kumasi.

(via everything-ghana)

britticisms:

(via durgapolashi)

Arundhati Roy (1990s)

(via halfhardtorock)

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

Sufi Muslim dervishes

Istanbul, Turkey

(via forgetpolitics)

We integrated schools but never integrated the curriculum
Christopher Emdin (via yourpersonalcheerleader)

(via halfhardtorock)

Despite throwing support and resources toward finding or recovering Relisha they were apathetic to circumstances they exacerbated through unaffordable housing, an unlivable minimum wage, inadequate emergency shelters, broken schools and social service systems that all work together to enforce generational poverty. We must be attentive to the needs of Black girls, not just when they are missing, but when they are here in our classrooms, in our shelters and in our neighborhoods. Relisha’s story is our own and regardless of what we may find out about what has happened to her we need to fight to make sure that the systems in place provide safety for our Black girls who are the most vulnerable, those who are unloved and those who are systematically ignored. We need to place the responsibility of what happened to Relisha back on the agencies and institutions that are so quick to deny culpability. We need to hold our public institutions accountable because when we allow them to turn Relisha, Aiyana, Hadiya into singular occurrences it erases the pain and vulnerability in what it means to be a Black girl in this country.

astec:

a—fri—ca:

Sahara,  Niger by Basil Pao

I really don’t think we’re going to end racism by joking about it. Like i’m glad that the white liberals feel like they are less racist because they can joke about people who are more explicitly racist but that actually does nothing to help people of color

biomedicalephemera:

Facial clefts in the embryo and adult

Early in the development of the embryo, we’re basically just a tube, with a notochord (the precursor to our nervous system) and three layers of tissue. The branchial arches, neural crest, and somites join together as they develop to form the head and neck.

To become a creature with a face, this tube must close in a very specific way, and in mammals, the way that it comes together is very similar between the species. In fact, most mammals can end up developing very similar facial deformities.

In the human, there are 15 “clefts” (separations) that join together very early on in development. The primary regions of the face are completely brought together before the embryo is even the size of a penny (17 mm - about 2/3 of an inch). Most clefts are brought together before the fetus is 1 cm long - less than the diameter of a AAA battery.

Since most of the facial clefts are some of the earliest possible non-lethal deformities, the failure of one or more of them to fuse does not stop the development, unlike many other early congenital problems. For most serious deformities at this stage, the genes simply stop giving cogent signals to one another, and the female’s body self-aborts, as it is not evolutionarily advantageous to create a non-viable fetus.

———————————————————————

While all facial clefts have the potential to fail to fuse, the ones that most frequently result in viable fetuses are the clefts of the palate and the maxillary processes. These can occur bilaterally (on both sides), unilaterally (only on one side), and can involve part of the palate, only the palate, only the lip, or the complete palate and lip structure. The most common defect is an isolated unilateral cleft lip, formerly known as a "harelip" (though that term is often seen as derogatory these days).

Due to the fact that the face is the way most people identify one another, its importance in human culture can make any facial deformity a problem for the person who has it. While cleft lips have been fixed for as long as people have had stitches (at least 5000 years), fixing the bone clefts has been much more difficult and daunting. In 1827, John Peter Mettauer completed the first successful bone-flap transplant to fix a cleft palate, and reconstructive surgery has only improved since then.

While most facial cleft anomalies are now routinely fixed at a very young age in industrialized nations, there are many parts of the world where hospital access is limited, and cleft deformities are not easily repaired. The loss of nutrition that suckling difficulty in children with cleft palates have can have life-long consequences. And that’s assuming the infant survives.

Charitable organizations such as Operation Smile attempt to fill that gap - literally.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)